Gen Anthro featured in Stanford News

Over the past two weeks, reporter Taylor Kubota talked to many members of Team Gen Anthro – me, Mike, Miles, Tom, and our student Meghan Shea – about the podcast, class, and history of the project. We’re all very excited to be featured in Stanford News! Taylor’s piece documents what we’ve been up to in the past six months, especially the courses that Mike, Miles, and I taught at Stanford in fall quarter 2016 and winter quarter 2017. Also, shout-out to all the campus partners who supported the project! We are so grateful.

Read the full article here: “Stanford’s Generation Anthropocene podcast is back”

Also, Worldivew social media maven Ali took a bunch of photos of the class. Check out a few below!

READ MORE

Seasons 1–6: playlists

Welcome to the archives of Generation Anthropocene. Seasons 1 through 6 ran from April 2012 to August 2014. We talked to dozens of experts, scientists, writers, thinkers, entrepreneurs, filmmakers, and more. Back in day, we pretty much only did long-form interviews, though you’ll find a few produced pieces sprinkled in. Every episode has its own individual post on our website, but we’ve also organized the seasons into playlists on SoundCloud. Here they are, all in one place, for easy access. Happy listening!

Season 1

READ MORE

Earth in Human Hands

“What if life isn’t something that happens *on* a planet, but is something that happens *to* a planet? What if the planet itself is alive?” Thus begins one of the many intriguing thought exercises in astrobiologist David Grinspoon’s new book, Earth in Human Hands (available Dec. 6, 2016). David has long been a friend of the show, in large part because he possesses a unique ability to bring the geologic imagination to life. His approach to the Anthropocene READ MORE

On the Precipice

Sometime in the near geological future, the landscape of life on earth as we know it will be transformed. It’s a mass extinction, and it’s only happened five times before in Earth’s history. There have been severe ice ages, perplexing loses of oxygen from our oceans, massive volcanic eruptions, meteor impacts. And now, we’re on the precipice of a sixth mass extinction… and it’s nothing like our planet has ever seen before. In Season 8’s final episode, producer Miles Traer dives into the sixth mass extinction: Are we in it? What can the previous mass extinctions teach us about READ MORE

A Tale of Two Grains

Food security may be the most important issue we’ll face in the coming decades. With global population on the rise and a changing climate, the future of food is greatly uncertain. These realities have prompted some scientists to start looking at crops that might be well suited to these global changes, foods that are drought resistant and nutritionally rich. That’s where “superfoods” like quinoa and amaranth come in. In this week’s READ MORE

Are we alone in the universe?

How did life begin on Earth? Curiously, scientists often search for the answer on other planets or moons in our solar system. After all, if we want to see whether our theories are right, we need to find another example of life somewhere. The search has taken us to some strange places seemingly frozen in time that give us hints to what Earth looked like billions of years ago when life first appeared in the geologic record: places like Mars that show evidence of fossil oceans, and places like Saturn’s moon, Enceladus, that show evidence of liquid water oceans containing organic READ MORE

Environmental Icon David Suzuki

This week we bring you an intergenerational conversation featuring David Suzuki, who is a Canadian scientist, activist, and media figure. Since the 1970s, Suzuki has hosted both radio and television shows about the natural world and environmental issues. A self-described “elder,” Suzuki READ MORE